Info

" *"+CHR$ (34)+"#$%&'()!Sw—vz6: 753190248sW =

VZAXJE.UlDCHTNMBRL?POYGK,QF; @axje>

uidchtrimbrl/povgk< qf +"

:MID$ (D$,8,6)= CHR$(8) +" "+ CHR$(13): PRINT

Program Listing 2 — Input

5 '*** INFILTER 3/7/82 **** "** BY RICHARD C. METZLER ***

:FF$= CHR$(8) + CHR$(13) + CHR$(24) + STRING$(3,128) +

"0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ !"+ CHR$(34) + "#$%&'(): *-0? + : <§>;,./("+ CHR$(2) + CHR$(3) + CHR$(4) + CHR$(5) + CHR$(6) :ARW$ = CHR$(91) + CHR$(92) + CHR$(93) + CHR$(94) + CHR$(95)

40 '*** EXECUTIVE PROGRAM TO EXERCISE INPUT SUBROUTINE *** 50 :

:LN=99: GOSUB 70: PRINT OT$ :SS$="INT": LN=4: GOSUB 70: PRINT OT$ :SS$="DEC": LN=23: GOSUB 70: PRINT OT$ :SS$="HEX": LN=4: GOSUB 70: PRINT OT$ :SS$="FILESPEC": LN=12: GOSUB 70: PRINT OT$ :STOP

:lN=((LN AND (LN<63)) OR (63 AND (LN>=63))) :l=1: GOSUB 170 :OT$= STRING$(64,0) 80 :

:IF SS$="INT" THEN FL$= LER$(FF$,16): MID$(FL$,4,1)=""" ELSE IF SS$="DEC" THEN FL$= LER$(FF$,16): MlD$(FL$,4,1 )="—"

:MID$(FL$,5,1)="." ELSE IF SS$="HEX" THEN

:IF SS$= "FILESPEC" THEN FL$= LER$(FF$,42):

:J=(J+1) AND 7: PRINT CHR$(14AND(J=1) OR 15 AND (J=5));

:IN$= INKEY$: K=(INSTR(FL$,IN$) AND (IN$>"")) :ON I AND (SS$= "FILESPEC") GOSUB 230 :ON K GOSUB 130,150,170,190,210,210 :ON —(K>66) GOSUB 260 :ON —(K>3) GOSUB 250 : l=I —I •.NEXT 110 :

:l = ((I—1)AND63) :OT$=LEFT$(OT$,l) PRINT STRING$(LN—I,32) :SS$="":LN=8 :RETURN

PRINT CHR$(136) CHR$(24); :IF l>1 THEN 1=1-1: PRINT CHR$(24) CHR$(136) CHR$(24);: RETURN ELSE RETURN

PRINT STRING$(I—1,24) STRING$(LN,136) STRING$(LN,24);: 1=1: RETURN

180 '*** "MINUS ONLY IN FIRST POSITION" SUBROUTINE 190 :

:IF l>1 THEN K=0 :RETURN ELSE RETURN

200 "** "ONLY ONE OCCURRENCE ALLOWED" SUBROUTINE *** 210 :

:IF (l>1) AND (INSTR LER$ (OT$,l-1), IN$)>0) THEN K=0: RETURN ELSE RETURN

220 '"* "ONLY LETTERS IN FIRST POSITION" SUBROUTINE 230 :

:IF INSTR(17,FL$,IN$)=0 THEN K=0: RETURN ELSE RETURN

240 '*** "PRINT AND STORE CHARACTER" SUBROUTINE *** 250 :

260 '*** CHANGE SHIR—DOWN—ARROW B-F TO ARROWS & UNDERLINE 270 :

80-U.S. Journal interviews Bob Snapp

Bob Snapp has earned the respect of many in the industry for his "enhancements" to TRSDOS. He has provided many of us with utilities and application packages that are truly first class and well documented. During a recent conference in Wisconsin, 80-U.S. had the opportunity to sit down with Bob and discuss a little about where we have been and where we are going. —Ed

Q. How about a little personal history?

A. It was about four years ago that the company I was working for was in the process of being sold to a larger company. I enjoyed being a big fish in a small pond, running the data processing department and the man I reported to was "The Boss," I enjoyed that. I didn't really want to be reporting to some guy working in another city who is reporting to someone else six layers down in management.

Bob Snapp

Bob Snapp

So, a friend of mine invited me to set-up a consulting business and we agreed on a contract that would guarantee enough revenue to get started.

I set up my own software consulting business at that time. This was also the time that theTRS-80 was being introduced and, of course, I had one. In one sense it was a toy, but in another, I could see the possibilities. I had been accustomed to dealing and selling packages for mainframes. I saw this as missing, there wasn't anything like it for the micros. I was just filling in something that should have been there in the first place.

That's really how we got started. I wrote for my own use and sold to a few businesses. Of course, they were delirious with it and then I thought, "Hmmm, maybe there is something here we can sell." It was a long road. Credibility makes a successful software business. We were building credibility to get some real revenue. We finally did that and built up an expanding product line.

I think that if I made any real mistakes in getting started in the TRS-80 software business, it was that I cut off my old business too soon. My advice is to hold on to your other source of revenue until you're really, really sure. Revenue that can really support you and your family.

Q. It appears that you feel someone can still jump into this business, start from scratch and do quite well.

A. I think so. There are still a lot of needs to be met and that's the secret to being successful. There will be opportunities for many years to come.

Q. Can you tell us a little about Snappware's current products or projects?

A. The primary thrust of our

80-U.S. Staff current product line is tools to assist in developing custom applications, to do it more quickly and more cost effectively. This is an expansion of a philosophy I developed while I was working with mainframes. We were not really using our people effectively and we were spending all our time trying to develop applications to save the end-user's time. It was getting to the point that the machine became more expensive. Something had to be done or eventually we wouldn't be able to get any application code out on the market. People would be buying machines for $50 and paying $5000 to develop software for it.

Q. What market are you aiming for? You have produced a number of good items for the Model II. Is there work on any others?

A. Well, we're into the Model I and III and LDOS. We support TRSDOS on the Model III, although we're not delirious about it. We are adapting significant portions of the product line to the new IBM personal computer, not because we particularly like that machine but because we know we will sell a bundle of them.

Q. Is Snappware your main occupation?

A. It's my only occupation, other than playing the stock market.

Q. How do you see the future of the TRS-80 market and its peripheral support groups?

A. I see it as a continuously expanding market. I sincerely hope that Tandy maintains the larger share or increases it. I have my worries, but the microcomputer market, generally, is going up and up and up. I like Tandy's computer products. It's good machinery, reasonably priced and there is a lot of good, off-the-shelf software for it. It sits very well in the marketplace. I

BEFORE YOU GET TOO EXCITED ABOUT LOBO'S NEW COMPUTER, THERE'S SOMETHING YOU SHOULD KNOW.

There's plenty to be excited about in Lobo's new MAX-80,™ as you'll see in just a minute

But first we want to warn you you can't get one right away. Already, orders are coming in faster than we can build systems However, if you can appreciate an incredible price/performance bargain, you'll agree the MAX-80 is well worth waiting for WHAT'S ALL THE EXCITEMENT ABOUT?

We're glad you asked And the answer is pretty simple Just look at this list of standard features

• 5 MHz Z-80B processor. That's 21/2 times the speed of a TRS-80 Model III or Soft-Card/Apple!

• CP/M included A few more dollars get you LDOS, an incredibly powerful operating system that lets you run standard Radio Shack software

• Software-selectable 25 x 80,16 x 64, and 16 x 32 screen formats. For full compatibility with CP/M and TRS-80 applications

• All disk interfaces built in Plug in any combination of 51/4" floppies, 8" floppies, and Winchester disk.

• Two RS-232 serial ports. Ready to plug in modems, printers, or what-have-you

• Centronics-type parallel port For any printer using this standard interface

• Plus numeric keypad with 4 function keys, software definable text and graphics characters, built-in clock/calendar with battery backup, and buffered I/O expander port

Now for the best part the factory-direct price for all this power is just $820-including shipping and Lobo's standard 1-year hardware warranty! WHAT TO DO NOW.

Call Lobo toll-free Tell us what hardware and software configuration you're interested in (see below), and we'll give you an approximate shipping date A $100 deposit will hold your place on the waiting list

Then get a good book to help you pass the time

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