Orch And The Hammond Organ

The partials in a register correspond almost identically to the drawbars of a Hammond organ. This gives you a great source of instrument definitions from countless music books published with Hammond organ settings. You can transfer the values for drawbars 3-9 directly into the ORCH register definition. Use the following chart:

Drawbar (color)

Pitch

Musical Note (from Middle-C)

Scale Name

ORCH Partial Number

(white)

8'

Fundamental, or as printed on the music. (C1)

Unison

1

(white)

4'

One octave above Unison (C2)

Octave (Eighth)

2

(black)

22h'

One octave and five notes above Unison (G2)

Twelfth

3

(white)

2'

Two octaves above Unison (C3)

Super Octave (Fifteenth)

4

(black)

13/5'

Two octaves and three notes above Unison (E3)

Seventeenth

5

8

1V3'

Two octaves and five notes above Unison (G3)

Nineteenth

6

9

1'

Three octaves above Unison (C4)

Super Super Octave

8

NOTE: ORCH-90's 7th partial is not available on the Hammond organ, and normally would be set to 0 for these 1 conversions.

For example, suppose that you find a Hammond organ drawbar setting for a Tuba like this:

00 8848 136

Discard the first two digits (00). They represent Sub-octave and Fifth drawbars (below Middle-C) that are used for very few instruments.

Then, take the next six digits ("884813") and edit them into a register definition like this:

JAS884813

Add a "0" for ORCH-90's seventh partial: JAS8848130

Then add the last digit in the Hammond setting ("6"): JAS88481306

Finally, add the overall volume parameter of your choice, for example, "C":

JAS88481303C

There you have it. TUBA for ORCH-90. Of course, if you really want ORCH-90 to sound like a particular instrument, you must take other factors into consideration. For example, think about the range of notes playable by the instrument. Tuba players don't play "Flight of the Bumblebee". There are certain physical limitations to consider, including note durations and articulation. You can consult music theory books for the typical range of various instruments. Look for sheet music scored for specific instruments. Chances are the arranger already took these characteristics into account when the score was written.

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